Identity.com Wants to Own Your Identity. Kind Of.

The tl;dr version:

  • Don’t sign up for an account with Identity.com; they will not let you ever fully delete your information.
  • You can unlink services, and that access to information is gone to them.
  • Not letting people delete account information is a lousy practice. Avoid Identity.com.

The full version:

I signed-up for Identity.com without doing the normal read & regret of their terms and conditions and privacy policy. This, of course, is my fault, and I’ll admit to falling into the trap due to the recommendation of a friend, but that’s hardly an excuse.

I signed up. I linked a couple of services (LinkedIn, Facebook) and took a look at the interface. Neat enough, I suppose, but it didn’t really show me much that I didn’t already know about myself, so the site sat in the ether with my information.

I decided to delete my account. I visited the site, but could not find a way to accomplish this.

I contacted their Customer Support asking to delete my account, and this is the response I received:

Thank you for contacting Identity.com!

Your identity.com account is yours to keep and cannot be totally deactivated, but you can control whether other people can see your public profile. Please note that once you remove a service from your account, identity.com will no longer have access to your data from that service.

To change how others view your public profile, go to Account Settings

When you select “Only me”, only you will be able to view your public profile and all the information it contains. Your name will not appear in search results.

You will still be able to sign in to your identity.com account and view your own profile, and you can change your settings at any time.

Please let me know if I can help you further.

Sincerely,
Mxxxxxx S
Identity Support Team Member

The bolding is mine. I’m sure the wording is carefully chosen, but if I cannot totally deactivate an account, I’m not happy.

They will also no longer have access to my data from a service that I remove–but what about all the accessed data before that? Did they store it? They don’t really say, and if I can’t totally remove an account, I don’t totally trust a company to do what’s right in this situation.

This is a poor experience for me. It’s a risk that I took, and this is, again, my fault. It’s entirely too easy to have your digital data exist everywhere, and in the hands of entities that may not have your best interests in mind, and I’m generally pretty cautious about this. My hope is that a service like Identity.com will fizzle and die before they get an opportunity to do anything malicious, but there’s no real way for me to actually know.

Buyer <ahem> beware.

Until Identity.com can update their policy in regards to accounts, I’d avoid them.

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